letyourdreamsoar:

redbluepurpleblack:

"I was born with very blonde, curly hair, and a mixture of Scottish and English genes, and my complexion is very ruddy and healthy. In making him with this raven black hair and blanching my face of all color, it changes my features. Suddenly my blue eyes look a lot bluer, which lends a severity to my face. And even my own smile has a distorted menace to it. Whatever comes through me naturally is distorted. It’s almost like a filter on a light." Tom Hiddleston.

you are a light, Mr. Hiddleston.

The evidence about his eye color is here. Thank you.

(Source: lokihiddlestonx)

13,211 notes

ostracizedpoodle:

Im not allowed outside after dark because i outshine all the stars and the moon so baby sea turtles always end up flocking to me

119,241 notes

songofages:

blackyrider:

that’s the face of a best friend who just found the gold mine of a embarrassing nickname made for teasing

Sherl, Shezza, man so much material here.

(Source: sherlocked-for-life)

61,333 notes

valeria2067:

mu5icliz:

"So, the balance of probability is …?"

image

55,263 notes

ancientart:

Hellenistic gold wreath, dates to about 350-300 BC, from the Dardanelles, modern Turkey. GR 1908.4-14.1.
Two cicadas and a bee nestle among the oak-leaves

This naturalistic wreath of oak-leaves and acorns is supported on two golden branches that are now reinforced by a modern copper core. At the back the branches end in obliquely cut end-plates, at the front they are held together by a split pin fastener concealed by a golden bee. Each branch bears six sprays with eight leaves and seven or eight acorns, as well as a cicada. Additionally, about a dozen single leaves are attached directly to each branch.
Gold wreaths were made in imitation of various leaves, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities; for example, the oak was sacred to Zeus.
Wreaths were left in burials in Macedonia, southern Italy, Asia Minor and the North Pontic area from the fourth century onwards. This wreath is said to have come from a tomb somewhere on the Dardanelles. Despite their obvious fragility, the Greek orator Demosthenes (384-322 BC) writes that gold wreaths were worn for certain religious ceremonies. The inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries also show that large numbers of gold wreaths were left as dedications. The dedicators might be individuals (including men, women, foreigners or officials at the end of a term of office), or states or foreign powers.

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Sam Teigen.

ancientart:

Hellenistic gold wreath, dates to about 350-300 BC, from the Dardanelles, modern Turkey. GR 1908.4-14.1.

Two cicadas and a bee nestle among the oak-leaves

This naturalistic wreath of oak-leaves and acorns is supported on two golden branches that are now reinforced by a modern copper core. At the back the branches end in obliquely cut end-plates, at the front they are held together by a split pin fastener concealed by a golden bee. Each branch bears six sprays with eight leaves and seven or eight acorns, as well as a cicada. Additionally, about a dozen single leaves are attached directly to each branch.

Gold wreaths were made in imitation of various leaves, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities; for example, the oak was sacred to Zeus.

Wreaths were left in burials in Macedonia, southern Italy, Asia Minor and the North Pontic area from the fourth century onwards. This wreath is said to have come from a tomb somewhere on the Dardanelles. Despite their obvious fragility, the Greek orator Demosthenes (384-322 BC) writes that gold wreaths were worn for certain religious ceremonies. The inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries also show that large numbers of gold wreaths were left as dedications. The dedicators might be individuals (including men, women, foreigners or officials at the end of a term of office), or states or foreign powers.

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Sam Teigen.

1,093 notes

martinekenblog:

Thread Laser Beams, And Other Weird And Magical Fiber Art On Paper

(Source: designtaxi.com)

719 notes

tivaattheopera:

thegestianpoet:

STOP shipping real people, or at least poke holes in the box

I saw this post four times before I understood the joke

156,809 notes

lulles:

Why is it that I end up finishing every speedpaint, and why did I have to choose such a detailed character just for practice haha. I just love Aigis.

lulles:

Why is it that I end up finishing every speedpaint, and why did I have to choose such a detailed character just for practice haha. I just love Aigis.

2,027 notes